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When buying a new boat or pontoon, the trailer you’ll be towing it with often takes a back seat. You get caught up in the size, power, and features that you need to make your summertime dreams come true. The boat’s trailer falls to the side as an afterthought.

But, not all trailers are created equal. Choose the wrong one and you’ll have a tougher time on the road and at the launch than you need to.

Trailer Length:

Truck and Trailer-1

This is simple, the length of your boat dictates the length of the trailer you need.

Trailer Weight:

BayShoreCruiseSportPackage-Profile

Every trailer has a maximum weight rating. This rating takes into account the total weight of your boat, gear, motor, fuel, and anything else you’ll be carrying. We recommend factoring in a 15% buffer in order to be safe and ensure you’re operating safely within the maximum weight rating.

Axle Styles:

Dual Axel Boat Trailer-1

Axles come in two styles: single and dual axles, both of which are available at Legend Boats.

Single-axle trailers are lighter, and therefor easier on your fuel economy. They’re less expensive to purchase, easier to move around, and easier to maintain.

Dual-axle trailers carry more weight and provide more stability, making them safer on the road.

Trailer Brakes:

Truck and Trailer 2-1

If your boat load and trailer have a combined weight of 3000 lbs or more, the Ministry of Transportation requires your trailer to have brakes. Trailer brakes provide great assistance during sudden stops, and help to prevent jack-knifing.

Structural Support:

Galvanized Boat Trailer-1

Trailers come with optional bunks and/or rollers. Bunks offer greater support across the surface of your hull. Rollers are much easier to load and unload.

Aluminum vs. Galvanized Steel

Your boat trailer can be either aluminum or galvanized steel.

Aluminum is lighter, less expensive, and a little less likely to oxidize. But, the differences are subtle. It really comes down to personal choice.

If you’re looking to match a Legend Boat to the right trailer, we already know what works best for your particular model. If you’re looking to match another brand with a trailer, contact your local Authorized Legend Dealer for assistance.

Learn Even More About Boat Trailers

Think that’s all there is to know? Behold, the rabbit hole:


This article was originally published on August 23, 2019. It was updated and expanded on April 16, 2021.